TIA Innovation Agenda

TIA Policy Innovation Agenda

Click on the topics below to jump to the issues, TIA positions, and goals:

TIA Policy Innovation Agenda   Broadband   |  Market Based Regulations   |   Spectrum Availability   |   Market Access and Trade   |   Standards and Intellectual Property Rights   |   Device Approval   |   Accessibility   |   Public Safety Communications   |   Health ICT   |   Research and Development  |   Tax Reform   |    Global Cybersecurity   |    Green ICT and Smart Grid   |   Intelligent Transportation Systems


 

TIA Policy Innovation Agenda 

The Policy Innovation Agenda covers fourteen areas, and is organized into three main categories: 1) Drive Investment; 2) Accelerate Competitiveness and Access; and 3) Enable Forward-Looking Technologies

1.    DRIVE INVESTMENT 

a)    BROADBAND – Through economic and regulatory incentives for network deployments and upgrades, U.S. Government can encourage continued investment in next-generation broadband infrastructure.

b)    MARKET BASED REGULATIONS – A continued light-touch approach to regulations, as well as certainty in the marketplace will ensure continued investment in a technology neutral manner.

c)    SPECTRUM AVAILABILITY –Innovative, next-generation wireless devices, applications, and services require spectrum availability for fixed and mobile broadband use; this can be achieved through further reallocations of federal spectrum, flexible regulations, improved spectrum management among users, and rapid implementation of voluntary incentive auctions. 

2.    ACCELERATE COMPETITIVENESS AND ACCESS

a)    MARKET ACCESS & TRADE – Securing access to international markets can be achieved by promoting trade liberalization and policies that are market-based and technology-neutral. 

b)    STANDARDS & INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS – Reliance on and promotion of the voluntary, open, and consensus-based standardization process, which includes the protection of intellectual property rights, is key to enhancing the global competitiveness of the ICT industry.

c)    DEVICE APPROVAL – Streamlining and globally harmonizing equipment authorizations and promoting process improvement will decrease both the cost and time-to-market for equipment manufacturers, ultimately benefitting the end-user with quicker access to devices at lower costs.

d)    ACCESSIBILITY – Increasing accessibility to technology for those with disabilities can be achieved through collaboration among stakeholders, policies that reflect technological neutrality and feasibility, and the usage of voluntary consensus-based standards.

e)    PUBLIC SAFETY COMMUNICATIONS – Improved access to advanced, interoperable communications tools for first responders and other public officials is vital to the public safety mission.

f)    HEALTH ICT – Healthcare systems should fully leverage the broad array of solutions available in the health information and communications technology ecosystem, including the devices, systems, software applications, and other technologies that store, share, and analyze health information.

3.    ENABLE FORWARD-LOOKING TECHNOLOGIES

a)    RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT – Strategic and robust U.S. investment in telecommunications research including a permanent R&D tax credit, multi-year federal research plans, immigration reform and education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) will enable the U.S. to remain a technology industry leader. 

b)    TAX REFORM – Congress must enact corporate tax reform to enhance U.S. competitiveness; U.S. companies are disadvantaged by the U.S. worldwide tax system and corporate tax rate, now the highest in the world. 

c)    GLOBAL CYBERSECURITY – Global voluntary approaches to cybersecurity are necessary to avoid policies that could negatively impact investment in innovation, market access, interoperability, and security of global networks.

d)    GREEN ICT & SMART GRID – Appropriate policies driving ICT’s potential to reduce energy consumption in other more energy-intensive sectors through smart grid, smart buildings and travel substitution will create jobs and help U.S. industry compete successfully in global markets.

e)    INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS – Pro-innovation and pro-competition policies will promote the societal and economic benefits of an advanced ITS ecosystem.

Back to Top


 

BROADBAND

Continued investment in next-generation broadband networks promises major advances in education, healthcare, teleworking, e-commerce, public safety and security. These capabilities are equipping users with the tools necessary to compete in the 21st century, making them far more productive, increasing their standards of living, and enhancing economic and physical security.  The consumer benefit of continued telecommunications investment is manifest. The average connection speed for the U.S. as a whole in the second quarter of 2010 was 4.6 Mbps.  Fast forward to 2015 – the US has an average connection speed of 11.9 Mbps.

TIA Position

Through economic and regulatory incentives for network deployments and upgrades, U.S. Government can create investment in next-generation broadband infrastructure.

    The United States must enact permanent tax incentives for innovation which will allow companies to make long term research plans while being assured that the incentives will continue for the life of the project.

    The U.S. must continue to connect students, patients and library users to the benefits of more robust broadband by increasing technological flexibility for Lifeline and E-Rate program participants, coupled with greater incentives for efficient and economical investment decisions.

Goals

    TIA advocates a light touch regulatory approach to ensure continued capital investment in broadband infrastructure, rallying Congressional support and rolling back the FCC's application of utility-like regulation on broadband providers. 

    TIA supports appropriate rules and regulation, including self-regulation, for broadband enabled applications;

    TIA will work to ensure that the FCC completes action on gaining additional funding Connect America Fund & E-rate program reforms containing increases in the available support for broadband investment and additional technology flexibility.

    TIA will help drive the FCC to adopt policies facilitating a transition to an all IP-Network, including the initiation of IP-transition test beds and the adoption of regulations allowing for the discontinuation of outdated, legacy technologies.

Back to Top

 

MARKET BASED REGULATIONS

Light-touch regulation promotes rapidly growing investment in new markets, such as cloud computing, M2M, cybersecurity and VoIP.

TIA Position

A continued light-touch approach to regulation, as well as certainty in the marketplace, will ensure continued investment in a technology-neutral manner. 

    Government must enhance efforts to stimulate investment and innovation in next-generation broadband deployment and adoption.

    Network operators should have the ability to engage in reasonable, pro-competitive network management.

    Technology and service neutrality are critical, and when regulation is necessary, it should be structured to promote competition among existing and emerging platforms and providers.

    Government should ensure uniformity in regulation for IP-enabled services through exclusive federal jurisdiction of these services by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), which will lead to increased certainty and investment in the marketplace.

    Technology mandates by the government hamstring innovation and increase consumer costs.

Goals

    TIA will work to ensure that our core principles are incorporated into the  Communications Act legislative re-write,  including: i) ending technology silos for services, ii) rules that  promote competition among existing and emerging platforms and providers,  iii) technology neutrality and iv) exclusive Federal jurisdiction for IP-services.   

Back to Top

 

SPECTRUM AVAILABILITY

Global mobile data traffic increased 69 percent in 2014, and is expected to rise nearly ten--fold over the next five years. More spectrum is needed to keep pace with this exploding demand.

TIA Position

Innovative, next-generation broadband wireless devices, applications, and services require spectrum availability for both fixed and mobile broadband use; this can be achieved through further reallocations of federal spectrum, flexible regulations, improved spectrum management among users and rapid implementation of voluntary incentive auctions.

    Avoiding a Spectrum Crunch: The U.S. needs to make an additional 500 MHz of spectrum available for broadband use by 2020.  The FCC has made a strong start by opening 5 GHz, AWS-3, and H block spectrum and is making progress on 600 MHz, 3.5 GHz, and additional 5 GHz spectrum, but more must be done.

    Spectrum Pipeline: Reflecting exponential broadband growth and long term needs, further efforts must continue to identify additional spectrum for availability in the next decade and beyond. Budgetary incentives and a long-term plan that supports predictability for both commercial and government uses will encourage more efficient use of this valuable resource.

    Voluntary Incentive Auctions: The FCC should maximize the amount of spectrum available for licensed mobile services, continue its efforts to attract the greatest possible number of broadcast participants, and conduct the auction promptly.

    Re-Purposing Federal Spectrum: TIA supports the clearing of re-purposed federal spectrum bands to the maximum extent feasible.  In cases where repurposing is not feasible, spectrum sharing should be pursued.  Sharing policies must advance good engineering practices to ensure an environment that protects those with superior spectrum rights from harmful interference.

    Alternative Spectrum Management: Use of new licensed and unlicensed approaches and other use management strategies, such as bi-directional spectrum sharing, may enhance available spectrum capacity to accommodate more traffic.

    Spectrum Efficiency: Spectrum management policies should prioritize global harmonization and coordination of spectrum allocations for all services; protection from harmful interference for licensed uses; adjacency to like services; and allocations of wide, contiguous blocks of spectrum.

Goals

  Incentive Auction Implementation: TIA will endeavor to ensure that the FCC’s voluntary incentive auction of broadcast television spectrum and the post-auction transition both proceed as swiftly and smoothly as possible.

    Federal Spectrum Legislation: TIA will work with Congress to develop ways to improve agencies’ ability to manage their spectrum resources, including improved mechanisms to enable commercial uses and creative incentives for agencies.

    Millimeter Wave Spectrum:  TIA will endeavor to ensure that the FCC’s final rules for millimeter-wave spectrum are conducive to promoting next-generation (5G) wireless networks and emerging Internet-of-Things applications, while also providing appropriate protections for incumbent spectrum users.

Back to Top

 

MARKET ACCESS AND TRADE

Over 75 percent of global telecommunication spending is outside of the United States. U.S. ICT companies need a level playing field to export products and services to the growing digital economy.

TIA Position

Securing access to international markets can be achieved by promoting trade liberalization and policies that are market-based and technology neutral.

    Governments should prioritize full, fair, and open competition in international markets, while avoiding conditions that could be considered localization barriers to trade or non-tariff barriers.

    Trade agreements should recognize that digital trade and ICT supply chains are inherently global in nature through provisions that avoid unnecessary barriers to cross-border data flows and restrictions on localization requirements for data centers and data storage, and other localization requirements.  

    Existing World Trade Organization commitments should be honored by all governments, particularly in the areas of the Basic Telecommunications Agreement, Information Technology Agreement, Government Procurement Agreement, and Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade.

    Telecommunications services must continue to be liberalized on a technology-neutral basis through bilateral and multilateral telecom agreements that provide for transparency, independent regulatory authority, and nondiscrimination against foreign suppliers.

    The U.S. government should encourage common approaches to data privacy that allow for interoperable regulatory systems that do not unnecessarily impede the cross-border flow of information.

    Governments worldwide should support a free and open Internet through the preservation of the multi-stakeholder approach to Internet governance.

Goals

    To help open Asian markets to the global ICT industry, TIA will urge Congress to approve the landmark Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).To enhance market access for the telecommunication sector, TIA will work to secure implementation of the WTO Information Technology Agreement (ITA) expansion, and provisions in trade agreements that lower barriers to cross-border data flows, avoid localization requirements, and other telecommunication priorities in the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (T-TIP), and the Trade in Services Agreement (TiSA).

    To combat protectionism and localization barriers to trade, TIA will contribute to the revocation of ITA-inconsistent tariff treatment of telecommunications equipment in India and advocate against local manufacturing and data storage requirements that restrict access to foreign markets.

    To improve the regulatory environment in priority markets, TIA will work to advance Mutual Recognition Agreements (MRAs) between the United States and other countries, including China and India.

Back to Top

 

STANDARDS AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS

Voluntary, consensus-based standards and a reasonable system of intellectual property rights are critical to fostering innovation.

TIA Position

Reliance on and promotion of the voluntary, open, and consensus-based standardization process, which includes the protection of intellectual property rights, is key to enhancing the global competitiveness of the ICT industry.

    The development of voluntary, consensus-based standards is a critically important element for innovation – and the continued commercial success of the ICT sector – which must be maintained and promoted through industry and government policies.

    Governments must recognize that “open standards” are developed, maintained, and governed using collaborative, consensus-based, transparent processes; that such standards should not be subject to conditions mandating licensing without compensation; and that they are available to the public at a reasonable cost (either for a reasonable fee or for free).

    Common approaches to conforming standardization policies must be globally influential in promoting market-driven standards that are based on transparency, technical merit, and openness to all interested stakeholders.

    Any standard that is developed through an open, transparent process and is widely implemented on a global basis should be considered to be an international standard.

Back to Top

 

DEVICE APPROVAL

Brand-new products and technologies ready for market cannot go out the door for sale without a rapid and streamlined process for regulatory approval.

TIA Position

Streamlining and globally harmonizing equipment authorizations and promoting process improvement will decrease both the cost and time-to-market for equipment manufacturers, ultimately benefiting the end-user with quicker access to devices at lower costs.

    Examining ways to improve governmental device approval processes towards increasing certainty and efficiencies must be a continuous process that includes proactive and open dialog with affected stakeholders.

    Globally, policymakers must utilize advanced approaches to the efficient regulation of ICT, such as the allowance of electronic labeling, reduced import restrictions, and the use of a self-declaring certification regime.

    Governments must rely on international standards, and strive for global harmonization of technical requirements based on these standards, to ensure technical compliance will maximize the widespread international availability of ICT equipment at competitive prices.

Goals

    TIA will work to ensure align enhancements to basic device approval schemes globally.

    TIA will work to streamline the FCC’s device certification process by resolving the open proceeding to reform rules regarding the authorization of radiofrequency equipment and working collaboratively with the FCC’s Laboratory.

    TIA will continue to support the FCC in their efforts to align the RF exposure rules with internationally accepted standards.

    TIA will work to improve device labeling schemes globally for ICT, both with and without integrated displays.

    TIA will work to effect implementation of E-LABEL Act in the United States, and to attain an eLabeling allowance in the European Union & ASEAN region in 2016.

Back to Top

 

ACCESSIBILITY

ICT products continue to positively transform the lives of those with disabilities. The ICT industry continues to work closely with the disability community to improve access to the technologies of today, while looking ahead to the products of the future.

TIA Position

Increasing accessibility to technology for those with disabilities can be achieved through collaboration among stakeholders, policies that reflect technological neutrality and feasibility principles, and the usage of voluntary consensus-based standards. 

    Government should support pro-competitive policies that encourage marketplace solutions and rapid deployment of accessible technologies. There should be an emphasis on solutions which are technically feasible, with a focus on people-centric or scenario-based designs that are outcome-focused (as opposed to feature/function focused). Supported policies should include the allowance of voluntary, consensus-based standards as safe harbors for compliance with regulations when appropriate, and the use of blanket waivers for classes of nascent products.

    TIA is committed to proactive discussions with the disability community and other stakeholders leading to new accessibility standards and the incorporation of accessible solutions into member companies’ product development processes.

    Regulators should encourage and rely on the development of voluntary industry standards and voluntary self-declarations of conformance to address goals related to the accessibility of ICT for consumers with disabilities.

    When developing any accessibility policies, the government must ensure that the required technologies are technically feasible and provide sufficient time for industry to come into compliance.

Goals

    TIA will work with the Commission to ensure any changes to hearing aid compatibility (HAC) obligations would not be overly burdensome and infeasible.

    TIA will involve key stakeholders from the disability community, the FCC, and the hearing aid industry in order to facilitate proactive HAC discussions.

    TIA will work with the Commission to get accessibility regulations involving the wireline and wireless networks IP-transition that are outcome-based, allowing for the use of alternatives, consistent with the CVAA.

Back to Top

 

PUBLIC SAFETY COMMUNICATIONS

ICT products and services are critical enablers in saving lives. A nationwide public safety broadband network is the critical enabler by ensuring that first responders and other public safety professionals have reliable access anywhere to cutting-edge technologies for mission-critical applications.

TIA Position

Improved access to advanced, interoperable communications tools for first responders and other public officials is vital to the public safety mission.

    TIA strongly supports the establishment of, and investment in, a sustainable nationwide interoperable public safety broadband network (NPSBN) and the deployment of Next Generation 9-1-1.

    Public investment should enable public safety/first responders to access the most appropriate technologies in the most efficient manner to meet their specific needs and resources.

Goals

    TIA will partner with the FirstNet Authority to ensure that it is able to rapidly move toward deployment of a nationwide interoperable public safety broadband network, including the adoption of a timely procurement schedule.

    TIA will help drive the rapid adoption of “next-generation technology” into public safety communications networks, including the adoption of a sustainable FirstNet business model that provides for the necessary investment, beyond the initial funding under the Spectrum Act, needed to build, maintain and upgrade the nationwide interoperable public safety broadband network.  

    TIA will advocate to prevent the adoption of regulatory mandates, such as proprietary location identification technologies, that would prevent users from choosing the most appropriate technologies to meet specific requirements. 

Back to Top

 

HEALTH ICT

The U.S health care system is harnessing advances in ICT products and services to extend the delivery of care beyond the walls of the hospital and doctor’s office.  These transformative technologies are expanding access to quality care for millions of Americans, resulting in improved patient outcomes and reduced costs.

TIA Position

Healthcare systems should fully leverage the broad array of solutions available in the health information technology ecosystem, including the devices, systems, software applications, and other technologies that store, share, and analyze health information.

    Government policies must promote the role of ICTs in advancing healthcare, particularly the harnessing of patient-generated health data from remote monitoring devices and services which improve the quality of care for Americans while reducing costs for patients.

    Governments must utilize all opportunities to ensure affordable and reliable access to advanced ICT enabled services.
    Government policies must promote a regulatory framework for healthcare that provides predictability, facilitates investment and reduces barriers to innovation.
    Government policies must support the adoption of interoperable electronic health records (EHRs) and the use of open, voluntary, and consensus-based industry standards for interoperability between medical devices EHR technologies and health information exchange systems.

Goals

    TIA will work to remove arduous restrictions on telehealth and remote monitoring services under Section 1834(m) of the Social Security Act for Medicare through efforts with stakeholders and potential Congressional involvement.

    TIA will advocate for the incorporation of telehealth and remote patient monitoring as covered services in key government healthcare programs, such as Medicare Incentive Payment Program (Meaningful Use) and the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP), through Congressional legislation and federal rulemaking processes.

    TIA will recommend that the medical device approval process be streamlined at the Food and Drug Administration.

    TIA will work with policymakers to increase regulatory clarity for mobile medical applications and other ICT products and services.

Back to Top

 

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

U.S. ICT research is significantly underfunded. While the ICT industry accounts for $1 trillion of U.S. GDP -- seven percent of the economy – federal research spending on ICT accounts for less than two percent of all federal R&D spending.

TIA Position

Strategic and robust U.S. investment in telecommunications research including multi-year federal research plans, immigration reform and education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) will enable the U.S. to remain a technology industry leader.

    The U.S. government must make long-term communications research a priority and funds need to be directed to key areas: spectrum sharing; universal broadband; interoperable mobility; and homeland security related fields including interoperability, security, survivability, and encryption.

Goals

    America COMPETES Reauthorization: TIA will work to ensure that legislation to re-authorize the America COMPETES Act incorporates federal research funding for network and communications-specific, pre-competitive, basic research.

    Updating NITRD: TIA will urge for final passage of legislation that updates the NITRD statute to encompass emerging research areas, while ensuring that existing funding is not diverted for non-research purposes.

    Immigration Reform: TIA will advocate for passage of immigration reform legislation that increases the H-1B visa cap, enables highly skilled foreign graduates of U.S. universities in STEM fields to receive green cards, and invests in U.S. STEM education.

Back to Top

 

TAX REFORM

An outdated corporate tax code is harming the competitiveness of U.S. businesses. Changes would make a large difference to the U.S. economy, and it is high time that Congress takes action.

TIA Position

Congress must enact corporate tax reform to enhance U.S. competitiveness; U.S. companies are disadvantaged by the U.S. worldwide tax system and corporate tax rate, now the highest in the world.

    The corporate tax rate must be reduced to a level that will enhance the international competitiveness of U.S. firms.

    The U.S. should move towards a competitive territorial tax system for foreign earnings, which will encourage domestic investment and boost our nation’s economy.

    A robust tax incentive for innovation that is permanent, simpler to claim, and supports investments by both large and small businesses must be included in any comprehensive reform.

Goals

    TIA will work to ensure that any comprehensive corporate tax reform legislation includes robust and permanent incentives for innovation, or alternatively that the current R&D tax credit is seamlessly extended or enhanced.

Back to Top

 

GLOBAL CYBERSECURITY

Millions of cyber attacks are launched against U.S. institutions every day. The average cost to resolve a single successful attack now exceeds $1 million, and U.S. companies have increasingly been victimized by high-profile breaches affecting millions of consumers.

TIA Position

Global voluntary approaches to cybersecurity and critical infrastructure protection are necessary to avoid policies that could negatively impact investment in innovation, market access, interoperability, and security of global networks.

    Governments worldwide must support cybersecurity policies that promote innovation; facilitate resilience; keep markets open; and do not create unnecessary barriers to trade.

    Efforts to improve cybersecurity in critical infrastructure protection must leverage voluntary public-private partnerships as an effective tool for coordination and collaboration on addressing current and emerging threats in a context of risk management. 

    A global supply chain can best be secured through a risk management approach promoting industry-driven adoption of international best practices and global standards. 

    Government and industry must leverage a partnership framework to increase the effectiveness of dialogue between industry and government (domestic and foreign) experts to discuss international standards and best practices. Internationally accepted best practices relevant to the products at issue should be utilized as important considerations when developing cyber security risk management and protection policies.

    Governments must advance efforts to streamline the bi-directional exchange of threat indicators to enhance near real-time situational awareness in efforts to improve detection, prevention, mitigation, and response to cyber events that may become incidents of national consequence.

Goals

    TIA will participate in industry efforts for Congressional legislation regarding 1) bi-directional information sharing; (2) enhanced cyber R&D; (3) Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA) reform; (4) better public awareness through education; and (5) greater public-private collaboration without adding regulations, mandates or increased bureaucracy that will impede investment in innovation and fail to improve the nation’s cyber risk profile. 

    TIA will work within FCC Communications, Security, Reliability, and Interoperability Council (CSRIC) to complete a voluntary risk management framework for communications sector in lieu of regulation. 

    TIA will work within the Executive Order 13636 Section 8(e) Working Groups to drive responsible and technically feasible U.S. government improvement of cybersecurity through acquisition. 

Back to Top

 

SUSTAINABLE ICT AND SMARTER POWER

ICT products play a critical role in making the U.S. economy more energy-efficient.

TIA Position

Appropriate policies driving ICT’s potential to reduce energy consumption in other more energy-intensive sectors through smart grid, smart buildings and travel substitution will create jobs and help U.S. industry compete successfully in global markets.

    Government adoption of appropriate policies driving ICT’s potential to reduce energy consumption in other more energy-intensive sectors through smart grid, smart building systems (lighting, DC power, HVAC, etc.), smart devices (sensors, intelligent electronics, etc.) and travel substitution are keys to create jobs and help U.S. industry compete successfully in global markets.

    Promote the role of ICT as clean technology in reducing energy consumption and carbon emissions.

    Avoid mandated energy efficiency standards that prevent innovation and competition.

    Engage EPA/DoE/CEC on development of ICT product energy efficiency standards and specifications as needed.

    Allow for private and secure consumer and third-party access to energy usage and pricing data to unlock the potential of the smart grid.

    Promote technology neutrality in smart grid policy to encourage competition and innovation.

    Support funding for both R&D and deployment of green ICTs, such as smart grid.

    Encourage greater adoption of telework and videoconferencing to facilitate travel substitution.

    Educate policy-makers ICT’s ability to improve energy efficiency through substitution of ICT in place of outdated technologies (e.g., travel substitution).

2015 Goals

    TIA will assist in securing passage of the Shaheen-Portman Energy Efficiency bill to promote federal acquisition of ICT equipment for energy efficiency purposes.

    TIA will help ensure EPA adoption of a test and report approach for Version 1.0 of the ENERGY STAR Large Network Equipment Specification.

    TIA will advocate to prevent DOE and CEC mandated energy conservation standards for ICT equipment and instead encourage adoption voluntary industry efforts through ENERGY STAR and other programs.

Back to Top

 

INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS

Transportation systems are increasingly depending on information and communication technology (ICT) to deliver improvements in efficiency and safety.

TIA Position

Pro-innovation and pro-competition policies will promote the societal and economic benefits of an advanced intelligent transportation system (ITS) ecosystem.

    Innovation and market competition must drive our nation’s policy framework in order to enable the US to lead the world in ITS technology.

    Voluntary, industry-led standardization can accelerate adoption and enable cost-effective introduction of new ITS technologies, while providing a clearer technology evolution path that stimulates investment. 

    Viable public-private partnerships between government and industry will make deployment of ITS technologies an appealing investment, as well as ensure sustainability of infrastructure and technological innovation over the long term.

    Government allocation of funding and resources to encourage research and development (R&D) and deployment of autonomous vehicles and connected vehicle communication technologies like advanced 4G/LTE, 5G, Wi-Fi, DSRC, and satellite will enhance vehicle safety and help ensure that the US will be globally competitive in the ITS marketplace.

Goals

    TIA will work with National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to insure it approaches any vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) regulation from a light-handed, technology-neutral perspective. 

    TIA will work to ensure NHTSA does not regulate consumer devices or vehicle software and will secure government adoption of a public-private partnership model and industry-led flexible approaches like self-governance as both regulatory and legislative entities consider automotive privacy, security, driver distraction, and other policy issues.

Back to Top